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The right frame of mind

Date: 27/03/2017

Choosing new glasses is a very important decision. As one of your face’s most instantly noticeable features, glasses are a significant style statement.

They should also provide you with crystal-clear vision that suits your lifestyle and daily activities. Small rectangular lenses can work well for people who need reading glasses, whereas larger wrap around lenses are practical for anyone who relies on their peripheral vision for work or leisure. Choosing frames is a personal decision that depends on everything from your age to your budget. However, we can offer expert guidance on which glasses look best and what designs would be most practical:

Facial features - Differently-shaped faces often benefit from particular styles of frames. For instance, high cheekbones and dainty features suit small curvy frames, whereas a round face can gain definition with angular frames. Eyes should be central within the lens openings, and the top frame should be just below your eyebrow line. Remember that new glasses should always complement your best features, rather than hiding them.

Prescription strength - Those wafer-thin frameless glasses can look great, but they’re designed for thin lenses that provide mild vision correction. Although slimmed-down lenses knock millimetres off normal thicknesses, we’d still recommend solid frames for anyone with a stronger prescription.

Comfort - If you’re going to be wearing glasses for most of the time, comfort is a top priority. Try different frames on, to see how they balance on the nose and rest against the ears. Do they sit symmetrically, and feel as though they’re securely held in place even when you look down at the floor? Remember that your new purchase can be adjusted in the practice to provide an optimal fit.

Typical uses - If you spend all day looking down at documents and back up to a computer screen, larger frames and lenses will prevent you looking over or under the frames – which can lead to headaches as your eyes constantly refocus. If all you need is reading glasses, then being able to see over the frames can actually be an advantage.

Bring a friend along! - They are able to see you from all angles and offer impartial opinions about which frames suit you the best; selfies can only do so much!